Available courses

Diplomacy and Leadership (II)
Dr. Kojo Assan

Diplomacy and Leadership (II)

MAIRD 106(II):

Objective             
Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

Display a sound general knowledge of some of the main ideas about diplomacy, especially its bilateral and multilateral forms, with an introduction to its transnational forms;

Understand the world of diplomacy and the leadership roles and activities of diplomats;

Enhanced verbal and personal communication skills through interactive discussion and debate;

Strengthen skills in analysing the organization and conduct of power in contemporary international affairs through the lens of diplomacy and, therefore, to be able to better understand current events and policy concerns;

Demonstrate historical, theoretical, and practical perspectives on leadership and diplomacy.

Content
Leadership and Diplomacy is designed for students interested in studying diplomacy from a leadership perspective. The course examines the role of leadership in the evolution and changing nature of the diplomatic dialogue between states over the past century, concentrating on challenges for diplomatic leadership at this moment in history. These challenges include: great-power leadership, notably the special role of US leadership; changing diplomatic practices requiring leadership, such as the widespread use of summit, conference, and public diplomacy; revolutionary and post-colonial leadership; individual leadership (the UN secretary-general) and moral leadership (Nelson Mandela); “middle power” and small-country leadership; regional diplomatic leadership; and, finally, non-state alternatives to state-based diplomatic leadership.

Mode of delivery               
Teaching methods on this course include lectures, seminars, independent study, plenaries, simulations, debates, roundtables, guest lectures.

Reading material               
Cohen, R. (2013). Diplomacy Through the Ages. New York, Oxford University Press, pp. 15-30.

Nicolson, H. (1969). The Ideal Diplomatist. Diplomacy. Oxford:  Oxford University Press, pp. 55-67

Jensen, K. (1993). Origins of the Cold War:  Washington DC:  United States Institute of Peace, 1993, preface, pp. 3-31, 73-95
Kerr, P. & Wiseman, G. (2018). Diplomacy in a Globalizing World: Theories and Practices, New York, Oxford University Press

English Communication Skills (II)
Jessie Bannerman-Wood

English Communication Skills (II)

ESILM 605(II):

Objective

The English language course is specifically designed to develop the English language skills required by effective leadership and management professionals in the everyday operation of their office. The course focuses in particular on improving participants’ oral communication skills, in both formal presentation, meeting and negotiation scenarios and more informal social situations.

Content

The course will assist participants to develop the English language skills for:

Communicating effectively and confidently in English

Preparing and delivering speeches and presentations on a wide range of topics

Conducting negotiations

Chairing and participating in meetings and conferences

Discussing current and foreign affairs

Speed-reading for specific information and absorbing high volumes of information in short periods of time

Writing clear and concise E-Mails and letters

Making and receiving telephone calls


Labour and the Legal Framework (II)
Yaw Adjei Afriyie Nketiah

Labour and the Legal Framework (II)

ESILM 701(II):

Objective

The program is aimed at providing practical-oriented training in labour law to students. Exposing students to labour issues in the business world, trade unions, and the public sector. The course aims at providing students with knowledge in labour law on the globe and Ghana specifically.

 Content

Students will be exposed to an introduction to labour law, employment contract, basic conditions of employment and termination of employment, Workplace discipline, the position of the 1992 constitution on labour law.

Labour supply

Labour Markets

Unemployment

Unionized Labour Markets

Suggested reading list

Bales, R. & Garden, C. (2020). The Cambridge Handbook of U.S. Labor Law for the Twenty-First Century (Cambridge Law Handbooks). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Gold, M. E. (2014). An Introduction to Labor Law. Third Edition. New York: ILR Press;

Gould, W.B. A Primer on American Labor Law 6th Edition Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Feldacker, B.S., Hayes M.J. (2014). Labor Guide to Labor Law Fifth Edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Cihon, P.J. & Castagnera, O.J. (2019). Employment and Labor Law 10th Edition. Massachusetts: Cengage Learning

History of International Relations (III)
Ernest Nana Adjei

History of International Relations (III)

MAIRD 103(III):

Objective

The main objective of the course is to let what students learn from the past influence their success in the future. It is intended to give invaluable problem solving and analytical skills by investigating a wide range of societies including African, American, European and Asian societies.

Content

The course combines the study of global relations with understanding the past through a range of skills and approaches. 

It places the historical context of international relation within the contemporary perspectives. 

Students will learn how to study the past through political, social, economic, artistic, intellectual and cultural channels. They will also get to understand the up-to-date political issues of international relations by analysing globalization and global governance. Students will engage in professional analysis of the complex international political environment of the twenty-first century.

The Subtle Boundary between International Relations and History. 

The History of International Relations World War I, 1914–18

Soviet Revolution and New International Relations 1917/ The Soviet Union Entered World Politics

The History of International Relations and World War II 

The History of International Relations Between the two world wars

 Cold War- new era in International Relations 

The History of International Relations and the Great-Power Competition   

 The History of International Relations and Africa 


Servant Leadership (II)
Dr. John Abbosey

Servant Leadership (II)

MVSI 507(II):

Objective

The objective of the course is to help learners understand life as a stewardship and work as a vocation. It is designed to enable learners appreciate leadership as a call to service and to honour God as a responsibility to influence the world for noble and good purposes. Upon successful mastery of this course, learners will be able to:

Define Servant Leadership and appreciate its significance for effectives leadership

Develop the requisite skills associated with Servant Leadership

Apply a Servant Leadership to their own leadership practice

Content

Servant leadership can sound like a conflicting statement; however, some people do have this leadership style. Our course in servant leadership teaches leaders how to lead from the back. The course covers the following topics:

leadership practices

sharing power characteristics of a servant leader psychology of servant and authentic leadership

building a team community

being a motivator

being a mentor when to praise or criticise

training future leaders

Self - reflection

Delivery Mode

Lectures and tutorials

Reading List

Keith, K. M. (2008). The case for servant leadership. Westfeldt, IN: Greenleaf centre for Servant Leadership. (Supplemental readings posted on blackboard or provided in class).

Greenleaf, R. K. (2015). The servant as leader. The Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership. [ISBN: 978-0982201220]

Blanchard, K. H., & Miller, M. (2014). The secret: What great leaders know and do (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers. ISBN: 9781626561984.

Christiano, R. (Producer). (2002). Time changer [Motion Picture]. United States: Five & Two Pictures.

Greenleaf, R. K. (2002). Servant leadership: A journey into the nature of legitimate power and greatness (25th anniversary edition). Mahwah, NJ: Paulis Press. ISBN: 9780809105540

Negotiation Skills
Ernest Nana Adjei

Negotiation Skills

MAIRD 500:

Objectives

This course aims at providing a systematic introduction of concepts, theories and practices, with a focus on equipping students with toolkits of handling negotiations understanding the mechanism of achieving integrative negotiation outcomes.


Content:
The characteristics of interest-based negotiation and negotiation strategies
The building blocks of negotiation
The difference of distributive versus value-creating negotiation approaches and usage of power and persuasion.
Preparation for the negotiation process
Strategic information gathering regarding self, others, and negotiation situations
The importance of and the ability of using communication and information exchange in negotiation contexts.

Suggested Reading List:
i. Raiffa, H. (2012). The art and science of negotiation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
ii. Brett, J. M. (2011). Negotiating globally: How to negotiate deals, resolve disputes, and make decisions across cultural boundaries. San Francisco: Jossey- Bass.
iii. Fisher, R., Ury, W.L., & Patton, B. (2019). Getting to Yes: Negotiating an Agreement without Giving in. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
iv. Thompson, L. L. (2011). The mind and heart of the negotiator. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.
v. Brett, J. M. (2011). Negotiating globally: How to negotiate deals, resolve disputes, and make decisions across cultural boundaries. San Francisco: Jossey- Bass.

Negotiation Techniques & Conflict Resolution
Yaw Adjei Afriyie Nketiah

Negotiation Techniques & Conflict Resolution

SILM 602:

Objectives
This course aims at providing a systematic introduction of concepts, theories and practices, with a focus on equipping students with toolkits of handling negotiations.

Content:
The course content is composed of two intimately related parts. The beginning part introduces the nature and types of conflict, mechanism of conflict escalation and de-escalation, and conflict resolution styles. The rest of the class sessions discuss the characteristics of interest-based negotiation and negotiation strategies.

Specifically, students will learn strategies to avoid various cognitive biases in conflict situations and negotiation, the building blocks of negotiation, the differences of distributive versus value-creating negotiation approaches, the strategies of achieving integrative outcomes, building trust and controlling emotions, utilizing power and persuasion, the importance of non-verbal communication in gaining information and negotiation ethics.

Some topics may also be covered in the context of cross-cultural negotiation to cater to the need of today’s international business environment.

Suggested Reading List:
i. Thompson, L. L. (2012). The mind and heart of the negotiator. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.
ii. Brett, J. M. (2001). Negotiating globally: How to negotiate deals, resolve disputes, and make decisions across cultural boundaries. San Francisco: Jossey- Bass.

Administration of Foreign Policy (II)
Ambassador Dr. Kodzo Alabo

Administration of Foreign Policy (II)

EMIRD 400(II)

Objective

This course examines the diplomatic world and the basic principles underlying foreign policy the links between diplomacy, foreign policy and international relations.

Content

The evolution of foreign policy,

The links between diplomatic practice and theory,

The forms and nature of diplomacy, modern trends in diplomacy,

Preventive diplomacy, the role of mediation and negotiation in diplomacy

Summitry and conference diplomacy

Analysis of the importance of foreign policy in the modern era.

The concept, design, legal framework and implementation of foreign policy

 Recommended Reading List:

Goldstein, J.S. & Pevehouse, J.S. (2011). International Relations. 10th ed., New York: Pearson Longman.

Yükselen H. (2020). Strategy and Strategic Discourse in Turkish Foreign Policy. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Acemoglu, D., &. Robinson, J.A. (2012). Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty. New York: Crown Business,

Krasner D.S. (2020). How to Make Love to a Despot: An Alternative Foreign Policy for the Twenty-First Century. Liveright; United Sates

Pee, R. (2015). Democracy Promotion, National Security and Strategy: Foreign Policy under the Reagan Administration (Routledge Studies in US Foreign Policy). Abingdon: Routledge

Practical Modules of Biblical Leadership
Prof. Spencer Duncan

Practical Modules of Biblical Leadership

SILM 501:

Objective

The course explores and analyses ways in which theology and spirituality underpin and challenge an understanding of leadership within and outside faith-based contexts. It encourages critical reflection on how leadership and management within the changing nature of contemporary society can be informed by insights from spiritual and theological traditions, especially Christianity, and be related to a theological view of faith, vocation, the Church and its mission. The connection between spirituality, theology and leadership is explored to reflect how these perspectives are integral to a Christian understanding of leadership. Learners will become confident in handling disciplines and methodologies that can inform an understanding of Christian approaches to leadership, including reflection on their contexts and preferred leadership styles. Students are introduced to relevant academic disciplines that are essential for leadership excellence.

Content

The following topic will be covered in the course:

Christian Faith and Leadership

Reflective Practice

Understanding Organisations

Personal Development

Leadership and the Unconscious

Christian Approaches to Leadership in the Public Square

Working Together

Transformational Leadership (II)
Chidinma Braye-Yankee

Transformational Leadership (II)

MVSI-512 (II)

Objectives
This Course is designed to build understanding of the basic principles of leadership from a spiritual perspective. The goal is for students to comprehend the theoretical and practical value of leadership for community, city and national redemption and transformation.

Content
Principles of Biblical Statecraft
Practical Modules of Biblical Leadership
Biblical Dynamics of Government
The influence of biblical principles on the evolution of modern-day theories of transformational leadership
The principles of leadership espoused by influential biblical characters such as Jesus Christ, Moses, King David and Nehemiah
Spiritual Warfare
Intercession
Spiritual Mapping and
Redeeming the Land

Suggested Reading List:
i) Dobbs, R. & Walker, P. (2019). Transformational Leadership: A Blueprint for Real Organizational Change. Expert Leadership Performance, LLC
ii) East, J.F. (2018). Transformational Leadership for the Helping Professions: Engaging Head, Heart, and Soul. Englnad: Oxford University Press
iii) Heward-Mills, D. (2014). The Art of Leadership. London: Parchment House.
iv) Magara, J. (2017). Positioning Africa for the 21st Century: The Pivotal Role of Leadership and Think Tanks. Kampala: Beeranga Mwesigwa Foundation.
v) Bass M., & Riggio, E. (2006). Transformational Leadership. London: LEA Publishers

SI Guest Lecture Series
Elizabeth Adjei

SI Guest Lecture Series

The SALT Institute Guest Lecture Series are designed to stimulate healthy conversations among members of the SALT Institute community and the general public on contemporary issues of national/global interest.

It will bring  together  seasoned  academicians  and  industry-players  to provide  relevant perspectives on the subjects taught in our classrooms.

The Guest Seminars will be held bi-weekly on Tuesdays between 17:00 to 19:O0Hours GMT and will take place online. The Zoom links will be circulated prior to the date for each seminar.

Participation is COMPULSORY for all students of the Institute.

Diplomatic Communication
Ambassador Dr. Kodzo Alabo

Diplomatic Communication

MVSI 420:

Objectives

To identify the nature, scope and concepts in Diplomatic Communication

To enable students gain mastery of the formulation and interpretation of diplomatic language and diplomatic communication and make them aware of their relevance to foreign policy formulation and implementation.

Content

Course Design, Expectations & Syllabus

Diplomatic Language

Writing Speeches For International Conferences
The Process Of Appointment Of Ambassadors &
Foreign Service Officers
Diplomatic Reporting
Other Forms Of Written Communication
Diplomatic Entertainment & Hospitality
Organising A Major International Conference

Reading List

1.       Pamment, J. (2015). Media Influence, Ontological Transformation, and Social Change: Conceptual Overlaps Between Development Communication and Public Diplomacy, In: Communication Theory, Vol. 25, No.2, 2015 pp 188- 207

2.       Dumitrascu, S. (2016). Communicating with Diplomacy and Tact: A practical guide.

3.       Jönsson, C. & Hall, M. (2003). Communication: An Essential Aspect of Diplomacy. International Studies Perspectives. Vol. 4, No. 2 (May 2003), pp. 195-210. Oxford University Press

4.       Cassidy, J. (2018). Digital Diplomatic Crisis Communication: Reconceptualising Diplomatic Signalling in an age of Real Time Governance. Working Paper, No 3. Oxford Digital Diplomacy Research Group.

5.       Batora, J. (2008). Foreign Ministries and The Information Revolution: Going Virtual? Boston: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

Human Rights & International Politics
Ernest Nana Adjei

Human Rights & International Politics

MASLF 203

Objectives:
The course is designed to provide learners with a firm grounding in the concepts and institutions of modern human rights, prepare them to answer sceptics and critics (including sceptics and critics “on the ground”) and provide a strong understanding of the practice of human rights, its failures and its many successes. The course equips students with interrogative skills about the idea of human rights. It deals with questions that arise about the realization of human rights.

Content:
The course is an introduction to human rights and the role they have come to play in international politics. The goal is to provide basic human rights literacy and to put students in a position to debate questions about human rights and dilemmas that arise about them.

Suggested Reading List:
i) Gerald, L. & Neuma, G. L. (2020). Human Rights in a Time of Populism: Challenges and Responses. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

ii) Primiano, C. P. (2019). China, the UN and Human Rights: Implications for World Politics (Rethinking Asia and International Relations). 1st Edition. Abingdon: Routledge.

iii) Bantekas, I. & Oette, L. (2020). International Human Rights Law and Practice. 3rd Edition.

iv)  Marino, K.M. (2019). Feminism for the Americas: The Making of an International Human Rights Movement (Gender and American Culture). Carolina: University of North Carolina Press

v)  Cohen, J. (2004): “Minimalism About Human Rights: The Best We Can Hope for?” Journal of Political Philosophy. 12, 2, 190-213

Social Research Methods
Dr. John Abbosey

Social Research Methods

ESILM 700:

Objectives
The aim of this course is to equip students with qualitative and quantitative research skills to enable them to design, conduct, analyse and report a social research project. The course aims at empowering students with the knowledge and skills to judge what methods and techniques are appropriate to particular research problems and also gain knowledge in ethical topics in research.

Content
Students will be exposed to the basis of empirical research, types of research, data collection for social research, data analysis – qualitative data analysis and quantitative data analysis, Ethical principles in social research and professional code of ethics.

Suggested Reading List
i. Yegidis, B. L., Weinbach, R. W., Myers, L. L. (2017). Research Methods for Social Workers (8th Edition) (Merrill Social Work and Human Services) 8th Edition

ii.  Bryman, A. (2016). Social Research Methods. 5th Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press

iii. iii. Russell, B. H. (2012). Social Research Methods: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. Second Edition. Thousands Oak: SAGE Publications

iv. iv. Neuman, L.W. (2017). Social Research Methods: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. London: Pearson v. Babbie, E.R. (2018). The Basics of Social Research 7th Edition. Massachusetts: Cengage Learning

Prophetic Past & Future of Africa
Dr. Mwirigi Kiula

Prophetic Past & Future of Africa

SILM 606:

Objective

The course exposes students to various narratives about the origins of the forebears of Africa and their transition through kingdoms and empires to present day independent states.

Content:

The course covers topics such as:
Early references to Africa in the Bible
Early Bible history of the descendants of Ham
The history of ancient Egypt and other ancient and less ancient kingdoms and empires (e.g. Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Songhay, Buganda and Zulu)
African contribution to world civilization; the Arab and European Slave Trades
The Scramble for Africa and colonialism
African contribution to European prosperity
Political independence and the incidence of bad governance
Idolatry and spiritual pride
The Biblical theme of restoration of nations, church and believers
Prophetic declarations and proclamation concerning Africa

Suggested Reading List:
i) Adelaja, S. (2017). How Africans Brought Civilization to Europe: Discover the Phenomenal Role of Africans on All Continents. Apapa, Lagos, Nigeria: Life Spring Publishing House.
ii) duCille Cecil, J. (2010). The Pattern. Mahomet, IL: Sonlight Ministries International.
iii) Nwankpa, E. (2014). Idolatry. Problems, Principles and Panacea. Nigeria: Rehoboth Publishing.
iv) Nwankpa, E. (2015). Arise Africa. Port Harcourt, Nigeria: High Calling Outreach Publications
v) Adamo, D. T. (2015). Africa and the Africans in the Old Testament. Benin City, Nigeria: Justice Jeco Publishers.
vi) Rodney, W. (2012). How Europe Underdeveloped Africa. Washington, D.C.: Howard University Press.

Academic Writing (III)
Jessie Bannerman-Wood

Academic Writing (III)

MAIRD 703(III):

Objective

This course is designed to offer a comprehensive insight and aptitude for developing research proposals and writing of term papers and dissertations by helping to ascertain the type of research to be conducted, the scope, and the appropriate approaches that ensure paramount results. It is geared towards enhancing the ability of students to effectively draft a wide variety of documents through increased sensitivity to language, structure and content. Participants will be exposed to a variety of techniques for drafting documents that are adapted to the audience and have impact.

Content

Social science research methodologies comprising of survey and field research, designing of interview guides and questionnaires, focus group discussions and tools of data

Effective document drafting

Composition of emails.

Getting it right.

Beyond text: structure, format and graphics.

Reviewing your work and basic email etiquette.

Quality assurance techniques to ensure structural coherence, linguistic clarity, and compelling messages.

Revising and refining your work. Methodologies to ensure structural integrity and attractiveness, arguments and proofreading techniques.

Theories of Leadership
Dr. Elzabad K Tanko

Theories of Leadership

SILM 500:

Objective

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the theories of leadership and discuss how these theories can be applied on the world economy with specific emphasis on the African continent. The course will draw the relationship between theories and the types of leadership and how practical these theories are in African context.

Content

This course will introduce students to explanations, classifications, theories and definitions about leadership, introduce existing contemporary literature to students. Clarify different dimensions of active leadership and generating considerable organizational and social research of leadership styles and behaviours. Students will be taught:

Contingency Theory

Path-Goal Theory

Leader–Member Exchange Theory

Redemptive Ideology and Transformation (II)
Dr. Steve Ogan

Redemptive Ideology and Transformation (II)

MVSI 511:

Objectives           

Leadership that has held sway on the continent of Africa over the last six decades of nominal independence has largely drawn inspiration from humanistic ideologies that deny the existence of God and His relevance in the affairs of men and nations.
The objective of this course is to allow learners to explore and appreciate redemptive ideology that can form the basis of the transformation of the continent.

Content

The following attributes of the Redemptive Ideology will be covered in the course:

The Concept of Ideology

The Nature of a Redemptive Ideology

Difference Between the Redemptive Ideology and Other Ideologies.

Kingdom Principles for Transformation: The Example of Jesus Our Redeemer

Practical Hands-on Approach to Solving Problems: The Example of Nehemiah

Judeo-Christian Ethics and Contemporary Ideas Contrary to Them

Spirit-Inspired Thinking and Generating Sanctified Ideas for Solving Problems

Practical Solutions for Dealing with Deep Distresses and Long-Lasting Reproaches: The Example of Thomas Sankara

Reading Materials                

Ogan, S. (2019). The Nehemiah Ideology for Africa: Redeeming and Rebuilding People and Places. Port Harcourt, Nigeria: High Calling Outreach Publications.

Magara, J. (2017). Positioning Africa for the 21st Century: The Pivotal Role of Leadership and Think Tanks. Kampala, Uganda: Beeranga Mwesigwa Foundation.

Nwankpa E. (2019). The Redemptive Ideology for Africa’s Transformation. Port Harcourt, Nigeria: High Calling Outreach Publications.

Sseppuuya D. (2017) Africa’s Industrialization and Prosperity: From Esau Syndrome to Structural Adjustment Strategy. Kampala, Uganda: Beeranga Mwesigwa Foundation.

Ogan S. (2014). Thinking for Total Transformation: Towards the Restoration of Kingdom Dimensions of Thinking. Port Harcourt, Nigeria: High Calling Outreach Publications.

Communication for Leaders and Managers (II)
R. Mawuli Coffie

Communication for Leaders and Managers (II)

ESILM 604:


Objective
The objective of this course is to build understanding of, Corporate Communication and Public Relations. The strategic importance of communication to contemporary organisations and its impact on society means the learners need to appreciate the significance and how to use it to enhance their professional interests and leadership aspirations.

Content
The course will look closely at how to make the written word as powerful as the spoken – whether it be an email, a letter or a report. By the end of the course learners should be able to:

define the strategic important of communication skills;

list the goals of management communication;

assess the extent to which information is lost in the communication process inside organizations;

define the directions in which communication travels within an organization;

list ways in which managers can improve organizational communication.

Reading List

Caraballo, M. (2013). 5 Principles of Effective Leadership Communication. [Online] Available: http://vingapp.com/5- principles-of-effective-leadership-communication

Murray, K. (2012). 12 Principles of Leadership Communication. [Online] Available: https://www.linkedin. com/pulse/20140708155025-80900892-12-principles- of leadership-communication
Zulch, B. (2014). Leadership communication in project management.  Proceedings 27th IPMA World Congress on Social and behavioural Science

International Non-Governmental Organizations (II)
R. Mawuli Coffie

International Non-Governmental Organizations (II)

MAIRD 404:

Objectives     

At the end of the course student will be able to:
Identify the theories, history and major actors that govern the modern operations of IOs and INGOs.
Develop professional-level proficiency in written communication skills.
Critically analyse and evaluate the roles and activities of IOs and INGOs in international affairs.
Demonstrate managerial and operational skills relevant to the activities of IOs and INGOs.
Evaluate the consequences of the political and moral choices of IOs and INGOs

Content          

The course discusses principles, concepts, commonality and distinction between two broad types of development agent;

state and non-state actors, in their attempts to institutionalize’ cooperation at the international level. Historical origins, ostensible functions and the roles in global politics and development,

external and internal political factors that impact their operations and effectiveness.

theoretical and methodological issues relevant to IOs and INGOs.

the importance of INGOS

Global governance, international regimes, transnationalism, pluralism, and collective social action apart from the basic understanding about NGO’s organization structure.

Reading material       

Weiss, T. (2018), Would the World Be Better Without the UN? Cambridge, UK, Polity Press,

Mathiason, J. (2007).  Invisible Governance: International Secretariats in Global Politics, Bloomfield, CT. Kumarian Press

Barnett, M. & Martha Finnemore, M. (2004).  Rules For The World: International Organizations In Global Politics, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2004.

Hurd, I. (2014). International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Charnovitz, S. (2006). Nongovernmental Organizations and International Law, 100 A.J.I.L. 348

Theories of International Relations (II)
Dr. Fatima Alabo

Theories of International Relations (II)

MAIRD 201(II):

Objective       

By the end of the semester, students should be able to:

Explain the major theories of international relations;

Identify and describe the main similarities and differences among the major IR theories;

Identify the leading authors in the IR field, as well as the theories, seminal works and key concepts they are associated with;

Understand the historical evolution of IR theory over time;

Apply theoretical frameworks to understanding practical international relations issues;

Content          

The course examines the core international relations paradigms: realism, liberalism and social constructivism. It presents their historical origins, the evolution of their various branches (classical realism, neo-realism, neo-liberal institutionalism etc), and studies the contemporary application of the most important theories in the field. The course also explores the core concepts and assumptions around which the study and practice of international relations revolve, such as anarchy, sovereignty and the nature of power.

Reading Materials     

Mearsheimer, J. (2014). The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, W.W. Norton Company, Second edition.

Walt, S. (2005). “The Relationship between Theory and Policy in International Relations.” Annual Review of Political Science 8: 23-48. (BB)

Rosenau, J. (2009). “Thinking Theory Thoroughly.” In Paul Viotti and Mark Kauppi’s International Relations Theory. New York: Longman, 17-24. (BB)

Walt, S. (1998). “One World, Many Theories.” Foreign Policy (Spring): 25-35. (BB)

Snyder, J. (2004). “One World, Rival Theories.” Foreign Policy. November/December): 52-61. (BB)

Diplomatic Protocol and Etiquette
Ambassador Novisi Abaidoo

Diplomatic Protocol and Etiquette

MASLF 510:

Objective

The course is designed to equip students with the knowledge of international principles of protocol and be able to apply protocol and etiquette principles at diplomatic functions and demonstrate an understanding of diplomatic immunities and privileges.

Content

The Diplomacy, Protocol and Etiquette

State protocol principles,

Flag protocol and flag precedence,

State and diplomatic ceremonies,

Title and forms of address,

Proper introductions and their responses, invitations and replies,

Official entertainment and private parties, table seating etiquette, global gift giving practices, and dining etiquette, Security issues in protocol.

Recommended reading list:

i)Ball, J. (2016). Protocol Handbook: A Guide for the Base Protocol Officer. (Student Report) Air Command and Staff College.

ii)Berridge, G.R. & A. Jennings, eds. (2017). Diplomacy at the United Nations at the United Nations. MacMillan: London

iii)Coutu, L. (2013). In Praise of Boundaries: A Conversation with Miss Manners. Harvard Business Review. Boston: MacMillan

iv)Dean, F. (2014). Beware of Knife Throwers Bearing Cultural Blindfolds. As told to Sharon McDonnell, New York Times. Lazorchak, A.(2013).  Business Protocol and Etiquette: Preparing (Student Report) Air Command and Staff College

v)Berridge, G.R. and A. Jennings, eds. (2017), Diplomacy at the United.

History of International Relations (II)
Dr. Fatima Alabo

History of International Relations (II)

MAIRD 103:

Objective

The main objective of the course is to let what students learn from the past influence their success in the future. It is intended to give invaluable problem solving and analytical skills by investigating a wide range of societies including African, American, European and Asian societies.

Content

The course combines the study of global relations with understanding the past through a range of skills and approaches. 

It places the historical context of international relation within the contemporary perspectives. 

Students will learn how to study the past through political, social, economic, artistic, intellectual and cultural channels. They will also get to understand the up-to-date political issues of international relations by analysing globalization and global governance. Students will engage in professional analysis of the complex international political environment of the twenty-first century.

The Subtle Boundary between International Relations and History. 

The History of International Relations World War I, 1914–18

Soviet Revolution and New International Relations 1917/ The Soviet Union Entered World Politics

The History of International Relations and World War II 

The History of International Relations Between the two world wars

 Cold War- new era in International Relations 

The History of International Relations and the Great-Power Competition   

 The History of International Relations and Africa 

History of Ideologies in Africa
Dr. Steve Ogan

History of Ideologies in Africa

 SILM 505:

Objective

This course aims at equipping students with knowledge on the evolution of African ideologies, the concept of “African Philosophy”, the foundation and history of the choices of African counties and how colonial masters have influenced the choices of ideologies in Africa. Draw a relationship between these foundations the how the ideological inclinations of African countries have influenced development.

Content

The course will introduce students to the history of ideological leanings of colonial masters, the politics of ideological differences in Africa, Africa’s participation in and perspective of the politics of ideological differences. The role the superpowers play in influencing the ideological positions of African countries and their effect on development in Africa.

Recommended Reading list:

Rouighi, R. (2019). Inventing the Berbers: History and Ideology in the Maghrib (The Middle Ages Series). Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press

Newman, K.S. & De Lannoy, A. (2015). After Freedom: The Rise of the Post-Apartheid Generation in Democratic South Africa Reprint Edition. Massachusetts: Beacon Press

Quainoo, E. S. (2018). Transitions and Consolidation of Democracy in Africa. Global Academic Publishing.

Cheeseman, N. (2015).  Democracy in Africa: Successes, Failures, and the Struggle for Political Reform (New Approaches to African History). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Willis, J.R.  (2015). Slaves and Slavery in Africa: Volume Two: The Servile Estate (Slaves & Slavery in Muslim Africa Book2). Abingdon: Routledge

American Foreign Policy
Ernest Nana Adjei

American Foreign Policy

EMIRD 309:

Objective

The focus of the course is to highlight the main political debates that animate contemporary U.S. politics and foreign policy.

Content

The theoretical frameworks in social science used to explain U.S. politics and foreign policy,

Competing explanations of the policy ramifications of the principal trends in U.S. politics and foreign policy.

American politics versus what is common to all major countries or great powers

Suggested Reading List:

Jentleson, B.W. (2013). American Foreign Policy: The Dynamics of Choice in the 21st Century. Fifth Edition. New York: W. W. Norton & Company

Hasted, G.P. (2017). American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future Eleventh Edition. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Hook, S.W. & John W. Spanier, J.W. (2018). American Foreign Policy Since World War II 21st Edition. CQ Press

Barnes, J. (2017). Bringing the Courts Back In: Interbranch Perspectives on the Role of Courts in American Politics and Policy Making. New York: W.W. Norten & Company

Hartz, L. (2016). The Liberal Tradition in America: An Interpretation of American Political Thought since the Revolution. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Academic Writing (II)
Jessie Bannerman-Wood

Academic Writing (II)

MAIRD 703(II):

Objective

This course is designed to offer a comprehensive insight and aptitude for developing research proposals and writing of term papers and dissertations by helping to ascertain the type of research to be conducted, the scope, and the appropriate approaches that ensure paramount results. It is geared towards enhancing the ability of students to effectively draft a wide variety of documents through increased sensitivity to language, structure and content. Participants will be exposed to a variety of techniques for drafting documents that are adapted to the audience and have impact.

Content

Social science research methodologies comprising of survey and field research, designing of interview guides and questionnaires, focus group discussions and tools of data

Effective document drafting

Composition of emails.

Getting it right.

Beyond text: structure, format and graphics.

Reviewing your work and basic email etiquette.

Quality assurance techniques to ensure structural coherence, linguistic clarity, and compelling messages.

Revising and refining your work. Methodologies to ensure structural integrity and attractiveness, arguments and proofreading techniques.

English for Diplomacy
Jessie Bannerman-Wood

English for Diplomacy

ESILM 605:

Objective

The English language course is specifically designed to develop the English language skills required by effective leadership and management professionals in the everyday operation of their office. The course focuses in particular on improving participants’ oral communication skills, in both formal presentation, meeting and negotiation scenarios and more informal social situations.

Content

The course will assist participants to develop the English language skills for:

Communicating effectively and confidently in English

Preparing and delivering speeches and presentations on a wide range of topics

Conducting negotiations

Chairing and participating in meetings and conferences

Discussing current and foreign affairs

Speed-reading for specific information and absorbing high volumes of information in short periods of time

Writing clear and concise E-Mails and letters

Making and receiving telephone calls


Strategic Management
R. Mawuli Coffie

Strategic Management

SILM 508:

Objectives

To succeed in the future, leaders must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets both traditional and emerging. The way in which organizations attempt to develop such competitive advantage constitutes the essence of their strategy.

Content

This course focuses on the analysis and synthesis underpinning sound strategic management. Strategic management is concerned with the long-term direction, scope and performance of an organization. Whether the overall strategy of an organization emerges from the interplay of functional departments or is a grand plan devised by one group, its success is contingent on the fit that is made between the organization and the relevant environmental dynamics.

Recommended reading list

Grant, R. and Jordan, J. (2012). Foundations of Strategy. NY: John Wiley &Sons, Ltd.

Grant, R. M. (2016). Contemporary Strategy Analysis (9th Edn.). New York: Wiley

Besanko, D. and David Dranove, D. (2012). Economics of Strategy. Wiley, 6th Edition,

Ghemawat, P. (2009). Strategy and the Business Landscape, Prentice Hall, 3rd Edition

Mcafee, P. (2005). Competitive Solutions: The Strategist's Toolkit. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Garth, S.  and Shepard. A. (2005). Strategic Management. NY: Wiley

Administration of Foreign Policy
Ambassador Dr. Kodzo Alabo

Administration of Foreign Policy

EMIRD 400:

Objective:

This course examines the diplomatic world and the basic principles underlying foreign policy the links between diplomacy, foreign policy and international relations.

Content:

The evolution of foreign policy,

The links between diplomatic practice and theory,

The forms and nature of diplomacy, modern trends in diplomacy,

Preventive diplomacy, the role of mediation and negotiation in diplomacy

Summitry and conference diplomacy

Analysis of the importance of foreign policy in the modern era.

The concept, design, legal framework and implementation of foreign policy

 Recommended Reading List:

Goldstein, J.S. & Pevehouse, J.S. (2011). International Relations. 10th ed., New York: Pearson Longman.

Yükselen H. (2020). Strategy and Strategic Discourse in Turkish Foreign Policy. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Acemoglu, D., &. Robinson, J.A. (2012). Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty. New York: Crown Business,

Krasner D.S. (2020). How to Make Love to a Despot: An Alternative Foreign Policy for the Twenty-First Century. Liveright; United Sates

Pee, R. (2015). Democracy Promotion, National Security and Strategy: Foreign Policy under the Reagan Administration (Routledge Studies in US Foreign Policy). Abingdon: Routledge

Labour and the Legal Framework
Yaw Adjei Afriyie Nketiah

Labour and the Legal Framework

ESILM 701:

Objective

The program is aimed at providing practical-oriented training in labour law to students. Exposing students to labour issues in the business world, trade unions, and the public sector. The course aims at providing students with knowledge in labour law on the globe and Ghana specifically.

 Content

Students will be exposed to an introduction to labour law, employment contract, basic conditions of employment and termination of employment, Workplace discipline, the position of the 1992 constitution on labour law.

Labour supply

Labour Markets

Unemployment

Unionized Labour Markets

Suggested reading list

Bales, R. & Garden, C. (2020). The Cambridge Handbook of U.S. Labor Law for the Twenty-First Century (Cambridge Law Handbooks). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Gold, M. E. (2014). An Introduction to Labor Law. Third Edition. New York: ILR Press;

Gould, W.B. A Primer on American Labor Law 6th Edition Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Feldacker, B.S., Hayes M.J. (2014). Labor Guide to Labor Law Fifth Edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Cihon, P.J. & Castagnera, O.J. (2019). Employment and Labor Law 10th Edition. Massachusetts: Cengage Learning


The Principles of Spiritual Warfare
Dr. Mwirigi Kiula

The Principles of Spiritual Warfare

ESILM 607:

Objective

The course aims at assisting students gain mastery of the underlying principles in the raging battles for the souls of persons, families, communities, towns and cities, nations and entire continents. It acquaints the student with the existing body of knowledge on foundations and deliverance; dealing with gates, altars and covenants; nations and thrones; intercession for leaders and nations; dealing with water spirits, the spirit of Jezebel and Babylon; redeeming the land and spiritual mapping.

Content

Students will learn how theology and Biblical principles can be made practical in solving problems in our   contemporary world. This is a learning and experiential course.

Recommended reading list

Nwankpa E. (2014). Idolatry. Problems, Principles and Panacea. Lagos: Rehoboth Publishing.

Nwankpa E. (2008). Redeeming the Land: Interceding for the Nations. New Delhi: El-Elyon Books & Charitable Trust.

Jacobs C. (2008). The Reformation Manifesto: Your Part in God’s Plan to Change Nations Today. Bloomington, Minnesota: Bethany House Publishers.

Jacobs C. (2011). Possessing the Gates of the Enemy: A Training Manual for Militant Intercessors. Grand Rapids, MI: Chosen Books.

Bako A. (2014). Establishing God’s Altar Everywhere: Taking the High Places. Accra, Ghana: Heartlife Publications.

Prince D. (2017) Spiritual Warfare for the End Times: How to Defeat the Enemy. Bloomington, Minnesota: Chosen Books.

Prince D. (2009). Secrets of A Prayer Warrior. Grand Rapids, MI: Chosen Books.

Masika T. (2016). Mindset for Community Transformation. Nairobi, Kenya: Sahel Publishing Association.

Obeng J. (2013). The Rod of Zion: Understanding How You Can Become A Fiery Rod in the Hands of the Rod Maker. Accra, Ghana: Dayspring Media House.

International Organisations – United Nations & Africa Union
Ambassador Novisi Abaidoo

International Organisations – United Nations & Africa Union

EMIRD 303: 

Objective

Primary objective of this course is for students to appreciate the role of IOs in the areas of War, Peace and Human Security; Human Rights; and, Development. It will give students an understanding of the major theoretical and empirical aspects of the role of international organisations in international politics, including, inter alia, their impact on: the practice of international cooperation and conflict resolution,

The maintenance of international peace and security,

The management of international economic relations,

 The promotion of international environmental standards,

 The prosecution of international crimes

Content

Amongst the subjects and issues of interest are:

The legal framework and institutional structure of the UN System;

The role of the major and rich powers in an organization where the vast majority of members are poor, recently independent,

Third and Fourth World states;

United Nations and regional IO peace-keeping and peace-making efforts;

The rules of sovereignty and non-interference in internal affairs and the practice of humanitarian intervention;

The strengths and weaknesses of the UN in the definition, promotion and protection of human rights;  

Recommended Reading List

1)  Freeman B. J. (2019). Behemoth: A History of the Factory and the Making of the Modern World. New York: W. W. Norton & Company

2) Rautenbach F. (2017). South Africa Can Work: How a free market and decentralised government will make us a winning nation. London: Penguin Books.

3) Armstrong, D., Lorna, L. & Redmond, J. (2012).  International Organisation in World Politics. London: Palgrave. 

4) Weiss, T. G., Forsythe, D. P. & Coate, R. A.  (2010). The United Nations and Changing World Politics. 3rd ed. Westview,

5) Armstrong, D., Lorna, L. & Redmond, J. (2012).  International Organisation in World Politics. London: Palgrave.

 6) Vijoen F. (2012). International Human Rights Law in Africa. England: OUP Oxford

Introduction to International Economic Relations
Dr. Kojo Assan

Introduction to International Economic Relations

MAIRD 302:

Objective

The objective is to provide students with the intellectual tools necessary to critically and creatively analyse economic issues and developments, both in inter-state relations as well as in the multilateral arena.

Content

The course will focus on:

International political economy and the history of economic thought;

World trade regimes and the regulation of international trade;

International financial systems and the role of institutions like the World Bank and International Monetary Fund; globalization, integrational processes, transnational corporations, the debt crisis and the politics of structural adjustment.

 Mode of Delivery

Three virtual lectures via zoom (each lasting at least 1.5 hours)

One virtual Seminar (class discussion moderated by Lecturer – 2 hours)

Eight weekly eCampus discussions (200 words of main post and 100 words of supplementary post)

Four written applications for skill and knowledge development (600 words)

End of course quiz test – 50 questions on the entire course material

Recommended Reading List

1.       Balaam D.N.(2018). Introduction to International Political Economy. Abingdon: Routledge

2.       Treblicork M.J & Trachtman J. (2020). Advanced Introduction to International Trade Law, Second Edition (Elgar Advanced Introductions series). London: Edward Elgar Pub

3.       Frieden, G. & Jeffrey A. (2011). “Invested Interests: The politics of National Economic Policies in a World of Global Finance,” International Organization. England: Oxford University Press

4.       Harrod R., Hague D. (Eds) (2016). International Trade Theory in a Developing World. International Economic Association Series. London: Palgrave Macmillan, London

Wheelan C. (2012). Introduction to Public Policy. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.


Innovation and Entrepreneurship
R. Mawuli Coffie

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

SILM 504:

Objective

Students acquire the knowledge and skills needed to manage the development of innovations, to recognize and evaluate potential opportunities to monetize these innovations, to plan specific and detailed methods to exploit these opportunities, and to acquire the resources necessary to implement these plans.

Content

Topics include entrepreneurial thinking; innovation management; opportunity spotting and evaluation; industry and market research; business strategy; business models and business plans; financial forecasting and entrepreneurial finance; pitching to resource providers and negotiating deals; and launching new ventures. Topics to be covered include:

Entrepreneurial Thinking

Innovation Management

Opportunity Spotting

Opportunity Evaluation

Industry and Market Research

Strategy and Business Models

Financial Forecasting

Business Plans

Entrepreneurial Finance

Pitching to Resource Providers

Negotiating Deals

New Venture Creation

Academic Writing
Jessie Bannerman-Wood

Academic Writing

MAIRD 703:

Objective

This course is designed to offer a comprehensive insight and aptitude for developing research proposals and writing of term papers and dissertations by helping to ascertain the type of research to be conducted, the scope, and the appropriate approaches that ensure paramount results. It is geared towards enhancing the ability of students to effectively draft a wide variety of documents through increased sensitivity to language, structure and content. Participants will be exposed to a variety of techniques for drafting documents that are adapted to the audience and have impact.

Content

Social science research methodologies comprising of survey and field research, designing of interview guides and questionnaires, focus group discussions and tools of data

Effective document drafting

Composition of emails.

Getting it right.

Beyond text: structure, format and graphics.

Reviewing your work and basic email etiquette.

Quality assurance techniques to ensure structural coherence, linguistic clarity, and compelling messages.

Revising and refining your work. Methodologies to ensure structural integrity and attractiveness, arguments and proofreading techniques.


History of International Relations
Dr. Fatima Alabo

History of International Relations

MAIRD 103:

Objective

The main objective of the course is to let what students learn from the past influence their success in the future. It is intended to give invaluable problem solving and analytical skills by investigating a wide range of societies including African, American, European and Asian societies from the fifteenth century to the present day.

Content

The course combines the study of global relations with understanding the past through a range of skills and approaches. It places the historical context of international relation within the contemporary perspectives. Students will learn how to study the past through political, social, economic, artistic, intellectual and cultural channels. They will also get to understand the up-to-date political issues of international relations by analysing globalization and global governance. Students will engage in professional analysis of the complex international political environment of the twenty-first century.

 Regionalism and Integration in Africa
Nana Yaw Mireku Yeboah

Regionalism and Integration in Africa

MVSI 605:
Objective

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the critical issues in Regionalism and Economic Integration by exploring the nature and evolution of regional integration processes among African states.  It examines the various facets of regionalism and integration with the objective of equipping students with a deeper understanding in the field, whilst giving them the necessary skills to relate concepts and theoretical perspectives to ongoing regionalization and governance processes the world over and Africa in particular. 

.

Content

The origins of regionalism; 

The theoretical and conceptual debates on Regionalism;

The formation of regional organizations in Africa; 

The structure, membership, functions, challenges and successes of regional organizations in Africa;

The Abuja Treaty, the Regional Economic Communities (RECs), the Tripartite Agreement, African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) and the Agenda 2063. 



Diplomatic Practice
Ambassador Dr. Kodzo Alabo

Diplomatic Practice

MVSI 430:

Objective

This course examines the diplomatic world and the basic principles underlying diplomatic practice, the links between diplomacy, foreign policy and international relations.

Content

The course covers:

the evolution of diplomacy,

the links between diplomatic practice and theory,

the forms and nature of diplomacy,

modern trends in diplomacy,

preventive diplomacy,

the role of mediation and negotiation in diplomacy,

summitry and conference diplomacy and ends with an analysis of the importance of public diplomacy in the modern era.


Adaptive and Restorative Leadership
Dr. Fred Nana Biney

Adaptive and Restorative Leadership

ESILM 602:

Objective

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

acquire general leadership knowledge and adopt different research practices in exploring a specific body of knowledge;

measure and evaluate self and other leadership attributes and critically reflect on these;

apply leadership theory to practical real-world projects in places of work and distinguish between various leadership solutions;

reflect on how different leadership knowledge informs context-specific leadership problems in times of rapid transformation;

distinguish between different innovative employee and team engagement solutions in managing a dynamic workforce and to professionally communicate change; and

communicate and present relevant knowledge & ideas clearly & concisely to a range of audiences.

    Content

    The course is designed to equip graduates with superior knowledge, skills and abilities that help them to emerge as world-class leaders. Based on reflective thinking and problem solving, the course is a niche offering in leadership consisting of applied work intensive modules that include real-world situations and industry-relevant problems. The course will equip graduates to build and connect teams, to drive innovation, and to build skills that help them lead across functional units. Importantly, it will enable graduates to learn the know-how and know-why skills of measuring and building employee engagement that lead to higher levels of organisational learning and firm performance in a world of constant disruption. With an emphasis on the application of leadership theory-to-practice nexus, the course will enable students to develop a toolbox of leadership practices and a set of dynamic capabilities in adaptive leadership.


    Human Resource Management
    Dr. Fred Nana Biney

    Human Resource Management

    ESILM 200:

    Objective

    This course aims at equipping students with the main principles and developments in Human Resource management in different employment settings and the diverse range of influences on people management in a global environment.

    Content

     An in-depth study core module introducing students to the principles and concepts of Human Resource Management in different contexts. Social and cultural contexts of HRM and different patterns of people management. Topics such as employment relations, training and development, occupational psychology, diversity management will be taught.

    ICT and International Digital Policies (Learner led)
    Dr. John Abbosey

    ICT and International Digital Policies (Learner led)

    MASLF 700:

    Objective

    Course objectives are: to examine the juxtaposition and gaps between current common ICT practices and formal policies and accountable stakeholders to understand current experience and the application of international development policy.

    Content

    This course will examine ICT policies and their relationship with society and development, drawing on multi-disciplinary theories and mutual learning from other modules.

    We will discuss issues including competition and regulation, ICTs and development, overcoming affordability barriers, information rights, the value of data, data sovereignty and privacy, mobile internet use, and ICT waste.

    The following topics will be covered:

    Policy and practice in ICTs and international relations

    Day-to-day ICT practices and digital divide between the Global North and South.

    International policy decision-making and ICT governance

    Diplomacy and Leadership
    Ambassador Dr. Kodzo AlaboDr. Kojo Assan

    Diplomacy and Leadership

    MAIRD 106: Diplomacy and Leadership

    Objective             

    Upon successful completion, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

    Display a sound general knowledge of some of the main ideas about diplomacy, especially its bilateral and multilateral forms, with an introduction to its transnational forms;

    Understand the world of diplomacy and the leadership roles and activities of diplomats;

    Enhanced verbal and personal communication skills through interactive discussion and debate;

    Strengthen skills in analysing the organization and conduct of power in contemporary international affairs through the lens of diplomacy and, therefore, to be able to better understand current events and policy concerns;

    Demonstrate historical, theoretical, and practical perspectives on leadership and diplomacy.

    Content

    Leadership and Diplomacy is designed for students interested in studying diplomacy from a leadership perspective. The course examines the role of leadership in the evolution and changing nature of the diplomatic dialogue between states over the past century, concentrating on challenges for diplomatic leadership at this moment in history. These challenges include: great-power leadership, notably the special role of US leadership; changing diplomatic practices requiring leadership, such as the widespread use of summit, conference, and public diplomacy; revolutionary and post-colonial leadership; individual leadership (the UN secretary-general) and moral leadership (Nelson Mandela); “middle power” and small-country leadership; regional diplomatic leadership; and, finally, non-state alternatives to state-based diplomatic leadership.

    Mode of delivery               

    Teaching methods on this course include lectures, seminars, independent study, plenaries, simulations, debates, roundtables, guest lectures.

    Reading material               

    Cohen, R. (2013). Diplomacy Through the Ages. New York, Oxford University Press, pp. 15-30.

    Nicolson, H. (1969). The Ideal Diplomatist. Diplomacy. Oxford:  Oxford University Press, pp. 55-67

    Jensen, K. (1993). Origins of the Cold War:  Washington DC:  United States Institute of Peace, 1993, preface, pp. 3-31, 73-95
    Kerr, P. & Wiseman, G. (2018). Diplomacy in a Globalizing World: Theories and Practices, New York, Oxford University Press

    Servant leadership
    JAMES MAGARA

    Servant leadership

    MVSI 507: Servant leadership

    Objective

    The objective of the course is to help learners understand life as a stewardship and work as a vocation. It is designed to enable learners appreciate leadership as a call to service and to honour God as a responsibility to influence the world for noble and good purposes. Upon successful mastery of this course, learners will be able to:

    Define Servant Leadership and appreciate its significance for effectives leadership

    Develop the requisite skills associated with Servant Leadership

    Apply a Servant Leadership to their own leadership practice

    Content

    Servant leadership can sound like a conflicting statement; however, some people do have this leadership style. Our course in servant leadership teaches leaders how to lead from the back. The course covers the following topics:

    leadership practices

    sharing power characteristics of a servant leader psychology of servant and authentic leadership

    building a team community

    being a motivator

    being a mentor when to praise or criticise

    training future leaders

    Self - reflection

    Delivery Mode

    Lectures and tutorials

    Reading List

    Keith, K. M. (2008). The case for servant leadership. Westfeldt, IN: Greenleaf centre for Servant Leadership. (Supplemental readings posted on blackboard or provided in class).

    Greenleaf, R. K. (2015). The servant as leader. The Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership. [ISBN: 978-0982201220]

    Blanchard, K. H., & Miller, M. (2014). The secret: What great leaders know and do (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers. ISBN: 9781626561984.

    Christiano, R. (Producer). (2002). Time changer [Motion Picture]. United States: Five & Two Pictures.

    Greenleaf, R. K. (2002). Servant leadership: A journey into the nature of legitimate power and greatness (25th anniversary edition). Mahwah, NJ: Paulis Press. ISBN: 9780809105540

    Redemptive Ideology and Transformation
    Dr. Steve Ogan

    Redemptive Ideology and Transformation


    MVSI 511: Redemptive Ideology and Transformation

    Objectives           

    Leadership that has held sway on the continent of Africa over the last six decades of nominal independence has largely drawn inspiration from humanistic ideologies that deny the existence of God and His relevance in the affairs of men and nations.
    The objective of this course is to allow learners to explore and appreciate redemptive ideology that can form the basis of the transformation of the continent.

    Content

    The following attributes of the Redemptive Ideology will be covered in the course:

    The Concept of Ideology. 

    The Nature of a Redemptive Ideology

    Difference Between the Redemptive Ideology and Other Ideologies.

    Kingdom Principles for Transformation: The Example of Jesus Our Redeemer

    Practical Hands-on Approach to Solving Problems: The Example of Nehemiah

    Judeo-Christian Ethics and Contemporary Ideas Contrary to Them

    Spirit-Inspired Thinking and Generating Sanctified Ideas for Solving Problems

    Practical Solutions for Dealing with Deep Distresses and Long-Lasting Reproaches: The Example of Thomas Sankara



    Mode of Delivery

    Teaching and learning tools include lectures, class readings, class discussions and presentations.

    Reading Materials                

    Ogan, S. (2019). The Nehemiah Ideology for Africa: Redeeming and Rebuilding People and Places. Port Harcourt, Nigeria: High Calling Outreach Publications.

    Magara, J. (2017). Positioning Africa for the 21st Century: The Pivotal Role of Leadership and Think Tanks. Kampala, Uganda: Beeranga Mwesigwa Foundation.

    Nwankpa E. (2019). The Redemptive Ideology for Africa’s Transformation. Port Harcourt, Nigeria: High Calling Outreach Publications.

    Sseppuuya D. (2017) Africa’s Industrialization and Prosperity: From Esau Syndrome to Structural Adjustment Strategy. Kampala, Uganda: Beeranga Mwesigwa Foundation.

    Ogan S. (2014). Thinking for Total Transformation: Towards the Restoration of Kingdom Dimensions of Thinking. Port Harcourt, Nigeria: High Calling Outreach Publications.

    Transformational Leadership
    Chidinma Braye-YankeeBarr. Emeka Nwankpa

    Transformational Leadership


    MVSI 512: Transformational Leadership

    Objectives     
    This Course is designed to build students’ understanding of the basic principles of leadership from a spiritual perspective. In today’s rapidly changing world, learning to build robust and progressive societies, lead and design communities and organizations to ride the storms of the global village creatively is critical to our ability to make impact.
    Course participants would be exposed to the timeless leadership principles espoused by influential biblical characters such Jesus Christ, Moses, King David and Nehemiah. The influence of biblical principles on the evolution of modern-day theories of transformational leadership will be explored.

    Content  
           

    The Course will expose students to such foundational modules: Principles of Biblical Statecraft,

    Practical Modules of Biblical Leadership,

    Biblical Dynamics of Government,

    Spiritual Warfare,

    Intercession,

    Spiritual Mapping and

    Redeeming the Land

    The ultimate goal is for students to comprehend the theoretical and practical value of leadership for community, city and national redemption and transformation.

    Mode of delivery       

    The mix of lectures, including lecturer-led and student-led seminars, video shows and insights from practitioners

    Reading material       
    Briner B., Pritchard R. (2008). The Leadership Lessons of Jesus: A Timeless Model for Today’s Leaders. Nashville: B&H Publishing Group.

    Maxwell J.C. (2001). Ultimate Leadership: Maximize Your Potential & Empower Your Team. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, Inc.

    Heward-Mills D. (2014). The Art of Leadership. London: Parchment House.

    Magara J. (2017). Positioning Africa for the 21st Century: The Pivotal Role of Leadership and Think Tanks. Kampala: Beeranga Mwesigwa Foundation.
    Bass M., & Riggio E. (2006). Transformational Leadership. London: LEA Publishers

    Foreign Policy and Diplomacy of African Countries
    Dr. Fatima Alabo

    Foreign Policy and Diplomacy of African Countries

    MAIRD 108: Foreign Policy and Diplomacy of African Countries

    Objective             

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an intensive introduction to the broad structures and processes of international politics and foreign policy in Africa.

    Content

    This course examines the key concepts and schools of thought in the study of foreign policy and Diplomacy of African Countries. Concentrating on the process of decision making, internal and external factors which influence foreign policy and Diplomacy as instruments available to foreign policy decision makers.

    The course will provide an understanding of the role and effect that foreign policy and Diplomacy have on international politics. Students will learn about:

    The linkage between foreign policy and diplomacy;

    The differing strategies that African states employ in achieving their aims;

    Understanding Foreign Policy Decision Making process with focus on the decision process, dynamics, and outcome, using diplomacy as tool.

    Students should be able to place foreign policy and diplomacy of African countries within their historical, political, economic, and geostrategic contexts. Major themes of foreign policy as well as diplomacy debates over them will be discussed.

    The foreign policy and diplomacy challenges posed by the significance of new foreign policy powers like China.

    Mode of delivery               

    Teaching methods on this course include

    Introduction to the various topics under the course

    Recommended reading list

    A specific material to be read and analysed

    Discussion board

    An assignment

    guest presentation via podcast                

    Reading material               

    Englebert, Pierre and Kevin C. Dunn. 2013. Inside African Politics. Lynne Rienner Publishers. ISBN: 978-1-58826-905-8.

    Herbst, Jeffrey. 2014. States and Power in Africa: Comparative Lessons in Authority and Control. Princeton University Press. New Edition. ISBN: 978-0-691-01028-1.

    Gordon, April A. and Donald L. Gordon (eds.). 2007. Understanding Contemporary Africa. Lynne Rienner Publishers. ISBN 978-11-58826-466-4.

    Cheeseman, Nic. 2015. Democracy in Africa: Successes, Failures, and the Struggle for Political Reform. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-13842-0.

    Alden and A Aran, Foreign Policy Analysis–new approaches, 2ndEdition (Routledge 2017).

    International Non-Governmental Organizations
    R. Mawuli Coffie

    International Non-Governmental Organizations

    MAIRD 404: International Non-Governmental Organizations

    Objectives     

    At the end of the course student will be able to:
    Identify the theories, history and major actors that govern the modern operations of IOs and INGOs.
    Develop professional-level proficiency in written communication skills.
    Critically analyse and evaluate the roles and activities of IOs and INGOs in international affairs.
    Demonstrate managerial and operational skills relevant to the activities of IOs and INGOs.
    Evaluate the consequences of the political and moral choices of IOs and INGOs

    Content          

    The course discusses principles, concepts, commonality and distinction between two broad types of development agent;

    state and non-state actors, in their attempts to institutionalize’ cooperation at the international level. Historical origins, ostensible functions and the roles in global politics and development,

    external and internal political factors that impact their operations and effectiveness.

    theoretical and methodological issues relevant to IOs and INGOs.

    the importance of INGOS

    Global governance, international regimes, transnationalism, pluralism, and collective social action apart from the basic understanding about NGO’s organization structure.

    Mode of delivery       

    Lectures, seminars, independent study, tutorials consisting of presentations and discussions.

    Reading material       

    Weiss, T. (2018), Would the World Be Better Without the UN? Cambridge, UK, Polity Press,

    Mathiason, J. (2007).  Invisible Governance: International Secretariats in Global Politics, Bloomfield, CT. Kumarian Press

    Barnett, M. & Martha Finnemore, M. (2004).  Rules For The World: International Organizations In Global Politics, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2004.

    Hurd, I. (2014). International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice. New York: Cambridge University Press.

    Charnovitz, S. (2006). Nongovernmental Organizations and International Law, 100 A.J.I.L. 348

    Introduction to International Law
    Larry Attipoe

    Introduction to International Law

    MAIRD 105: Introduction to International Law

    Objective             

    Identify the nature of international law and the structure of the international legal system and explain the basic elements of public international law.

    Undertake legal research using primary and secondary material to resolve practical and theoretical problems.

    Apply international law in practical contexts, including the law surrounding the use of force, space law and human rights.

    Analyse the impact of international law on diverse peoples and critique the operation of international law from a range of ethical perspectives.

    Reflect on and justify a legal position in a social context. Use feedback to inform individual improvements.

    Description         

    This course provides students with an introduction to law in its global context in this age of trans-national and inter-jurisdictional practice, with particular focus on public international law and its significance to Ghana law.

    The course covers: 

    Introduction to the development and nature of public international law as well as distinctive elements of international legal reasoning.

    Key features of international law,

    The sources of international law with emphasis on customary international law and the law of treaties;

    International fact finding;

    The peaceful settlement of international disputes; state responsibility; jurisdiction and immunity;

    The use of force; international human rights;

    Mode of delivery:

    Lectures, seminars, independent study, tutorials consisting of presentations and discussions.

    Reading material               

    James Crawford, Brownlie’s Principles of Public International Law (Oxford University Press, 8th ed, 2012).

    Donald R Rothwell et al, International Law: Cases and Materials with Australian Perspectives (Cambridge University Press, 2011).

    Gillian D Triggs, International Law: Contemporary Principles and Practices (LexisNexis Butterworths, 2nd ed, 2010).

    Vaughan Lowe, International Law (Oxford University Press, 2007).

    Donald K Anton, Penelope Mathew and Wayne Morgan, International Law: Cases and Materials (Oxford University Press, 2005).

    Sam Blay, Ryszard Piotrowicz and Martin Tsamenyi, Public International Law: An Australian Perspective (Oxford University Press, 2nd ed, 2005).


    Theories of International Relations
    Dr. Fatima Alabo

    Theories of International Relations

    MAIRD 201: Theories of International Relations

    Objective       

    By the end of the semester, students should be able to:

    Explain the major theories of international relations;

    Identify and describe the main similarities and differences among the major IR theories;

    Identify the leading authors in the IR field, as well as the theories, seminal works and key concepts they are associated with;

    Understand the historical evolution of IR theory over time;

    Apply theoretical frameworks to understanding practical international relations issues;

    Content          

    The course examines the core international relations paradigms: realism, liberalism and social constructivism. It presents their historical origins, the evolution of their various branches (classical realism, neo-realism, neo-liberal institutionalism etc), and studies the contemporary application of the most important theories in the field. The course also explores the core concepts and assumptions around which the study and practice of international relations revolve, such as anarchy, sovereignty and the nature of power.

    Mode of delivery       

    Lectures, seminars, independent study, tutorials consisting of presentations and discussions.

    Reading Materials     

    Mearsheimer, J. (2014). The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, W.W. Norton Company, Second edition.

    Walt, S. (2005). “The Relationship between Theory and Policy in International Relations.” Annual Review of Political Science 8: 23-48. (BB)

    Rosenau, J. (2009). “Thinking Theory Thoroughly.” In Paul Viotti and Mark Kauppi’s International Relations Theory. New York: Longman, 17-24. (BB)

    Walt, S. (1998). “One World, Many Theories.” Foreign Policy (Spring): 25-35. (BB)

    Snyder, J. (2004). “One World, Rival Theories.” Foreign Policy. November/December): 52-61. (BB)

    Communication for Leaders and Managers
    R. Mawuli Coffie

    Communication for Leaders and Managers

    ESILM 604: Communication for Leaders and Managers

    Objective
    The objective of this course is to build understanding of, Corporate Communication and Public Relations. The strategic importance of communication to contemporary organisations and its impact on society means the learners need to appreciate the significance and how to use it to enhance their professional interests and leadership aspirations.

    Content
    The course will look closely at how to make the written word as powerful as the spoken – whether it be an email, a letter or a report. By the end of the course learners should be able to:

    define the strategic important of communication skills;

    list the goals of management communication;

    assess the extent to which information is lost in the communication process inside organizations;

    define the directions in which communication travels within an organization;

    list ways in which managers can improve organizational communication.

    Delivery mode
    Tutorial sessions are devoted to such issues as report writing, meetings, interviewing, negotiating and making a presentation, and the development of leadership, team and inter-personal skills.

    Reading List

    Caraballo, M. (2013). 5 Principles of Effective Leadership Communication. [Online] Available: http://vingapp.com/5- principles-of-effective-leadership-communication


    Murray, K. (2012). 12 Principles of Leadership Communication. [Online] Available: https://www.linkedin. com/pulse/20140708155025-80900892-12-principles- of leadership-communication
    Zulch, B. (2014). Leadership communication in project management.  Proceedings 27th IPMA World Congress on Social and behavioural Science

    Change Management
    Dr. Fred Nana Biney

    Change Management

    SILM 503: Change Management

    Objective
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to apply knowledge about the major theories and perspectives concerning organization development and change management, analyse the role of the internal and external environment in driving or restraining change, design measures or KPIs to achieve and maintain results, demonstrate an ability to evaluate the needs and constraints of organizational change and to reflect on their own role and position in this situation.

    Content

    The major theories and perspectives regarding organizational development, creativity and change management

    The drivers and constraints on change in external and internal environments

    Change strategies and interventions

    The dynamics, measures and complexity of executing change

    Feedback, measuring and iteration processes.


    Delivery Mode
    Teaching and learning tools include lectures, class readings, class discussions and presentations

    Reading List
    Anderson, D. & Anderson, L. A. (2010). Beyond Change Management: How to achieve breakthrough results through conscious change leadership 2nd Edition 2010, ISBN 978-0-470- 64808-7.

    Tidd, J. & Bessant, J.  (2013). Managing Innovation: Integrating Technological Market an Organizational Change, 5th Edition, ISBN 978-1-118-36063-7

    Roberto, M.A. & Ferlins, E.M. (2004) Change at the Top Harvard Business School

    Balogun, J.; Hailey, V. H.; Johnson, G.; Scholes, K. (2009). Exploring Strategic Change ISBN: 9780273708025
    Angwin, D.; Cummings, S. & Smith, C. (2011). The Strategy Pathfinder. ISBN: 9780470689462

    Building Organizational Culture: Leaders as Architects
    Dr. Fred Nana Biney

    Building Organizational Culture: Leaders as Architects

    SILM 509: Building Organizational Culture: Leaders as Architects


    Objective

    Culture is maintained through attraction-selection-attrition, new employee on boarding, leadership, and organizational reward systems.

    Signs of a company’s culture include the organization’s mission statement, stories, physical layout, rules and policies, and rituals. The following objectives underline this course:

    Understand how cultures are created.

    Learn how to maintain a culture.

    Recognize organizational culture signs


    Content

    The course covers the following topics:

    Values

    How Are Cultures Created?

    How Are Cultures Maintained?

    Industry Demands

    New Employee On boarding

    Reward Systems

    How to Maximize On boarding Success

    On boarding plans should have the following characteristics:

    Visual Elements of Organizational Culture

    Mission Statement

    Rules and Policies


    Delivery Mode
    Lectures, discussion rooms, individual exploration posts, and weekly assignments

    Reading List

    Callahan, J. L. (2008). The four C's of emotion: A framework for managing emotions in organizations. Organization Development Journal, 26(2), 33–38.

    Chiaburu, D. S., & Gray, B. (2008). Emotional incompetence or gender-based stereotyping? The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 44(3), 293–314.

    Joseph, T. (2016). Developing the leader-follower relationship: Perceptions of leaders and followers. Journal of Leadership, Accountability and Ethics, 13(1), 132–144.

    Notgrass, D. (2014). The relationship between followers' perceived quality of relationship and preferred leadership style. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 35(7), 605–621.

    O’Reilly, C. A., Caldwell, D. F., Chatman, J. A., & Doerr, B. (2014). The promise and problems of organizational culture: CEO personality, culture, and firm performance. Group & Organization Management 39(6), 595–625 doi:10.1177/1059601114550713